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CONTINUING EDUCATION

CPE Monitor

What is an eProfile number?

CPE (continuing pharmacy education) Monitor, through the collaborative efforts of NABP (National Association of Boards of Pharmacy), the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE), and ACPE providers, allows you to electronically keep track of CPE credits from ACPE-accredited providers. To view and track these credits, you must first set up an NABP e-Profile, obtain your NABP e-Profile ID, and register for CPE Monitor.

What are Continuing Education requirements in New York?

  • 45 hours required each triennial registration period
  • At least 23 hours of live CE
  • At least 3 hours on reducing medication errors

Education Law, Article 137, Pharmacy

§6827. Mandatory continuing education. 

2. During each triennial registration period an applicant for registration shall complete a minimum of forty-five hours of acceptable formal continuing education, as specified in subdivision four of this section, provided that no more than twenty-two hours of such continuing education shall consist of self-study courses. Any pharmacist participating in collaborative drug therapy management pursuant to section six thousand eight hundred one-a of this article shall complete at least five hours of acceptable formal continuing education in the area or areas of practice generally related to any collaborative drug therapy management protocols to which the pharmacist may be subject. 

...Continuing education hours taken during one triennium may not be transferred to a subsequent triennium

4. As used in subdivision two of this section, "acceptable formal continuing education" shall mean formal courses of learning which contribute to professional practice in pharmacy and which meet the standards prescribed by regulations of the commissioner

Regulations of the Commissioner, Part 63, Pharmacy

§63.7 Continuing education. 

c. Mandatory continuing education requirement. 
1. During each triennial registration period, meaning a registration period of three years' duration, an applicant for registration shall complete at least 45 hours of formal continuing education acceptable to the department, as defined in paragraph (4)of this subdivision, provided that no more than 22 hours of such continuing education shall consist of self-study courses. During registration periods beginning on or after September 1, 2003, a licensee shall complete as part of the 45 hours of formal continuing education, or pro-ration thereof, at least three hours of formal continuing education acceptable to the department in the processes and strategies that may be used to reduce medication and/or prescription errors. Any licensee participating in collaborative drug therpay management pursuant to Education Law section 6801-a, shall complete as part of the 45 hours of formal continuing education, or pro-ration therof, at least five hours of formal continuing education acceptable to the department in the area or areas of practice generally related to any collaborative drug therapy management protocols to which the pharmacist may be subject, provided that such continuing education shall not be completed as self-study.

Home or Live Programs

Education Law requires that registered pharmacists complete continuing education. A minimum of 45 contact hours (at least 23 live) is required in each three-year registration period. The 45 hours required must include at least 3 credits (home study or live) of formal continuing education on strategies and techniques to reduce medication and prescription errors.

Medicare Part D Fraud, Waste and Abuse

All pharmacies will need to document that pharmacists and pharmacy staff members have gone through annual fraud, waste, and abuse training.

Blood Borne Pathogen Training

Blood Borne Pathogen Training must be completed annually for all Immunizer Pharmacists. 
 
OSHA Blood Borne Pathogens Standard 1910.1030 

1910.1030(g)(2)(ii)
Training shall be provided as follows:
 
1910.1030(g)(2)(ii)(A)
At the time of initial assignment to tasks where occupational exposure may take place;
 
1910.1030(g)(2)(ii)(B)
At least annually thereafter.
 
1910.1030(g)(2)(iv)
Annual training for all employees shall be provided within one year of their previous training.

Basic Life Support

All immunizers must have a current BLS certification.


COUNSELING

From the NYSED Office of the Professions page

When your pharmacist counsels you about your prescription, the pharmacist may discuss the following information with you:

  • The medicine's name
  • What it is supposed to do
  • When the medicine should be taken and for how long
  • How the medicine should be taken
  • Common side effects
  • Foods, drinks, other medicines, or activities you should avoid while taking the medicine
  • What you should do if you miss a dose
  • How you should store the medicine
  • If there are any refills of the prescription

DRUG DISPOSAL

Department of Environmental Conservation

Every pharmacy registered pursuant to NYS Education Law section 6808(2), and other retailers that sell drugs (over-the-counter, prescription medications, vitamins and supplements), including veterinary offices, must conspicuously display DEC's "Proper Disposal of Pharmaceuticals" notice as required under New York's Drug Management and Disposal Act of 2008.

Medication Drop Boxes

The most convenient medication disposal method is a local drop-box or drug take-back day which accepts a variety of preparations (over-the-counter medications, oral prescription medications, topical creams, ointments, patches, inhalers, solutions, suspensions, suppositories, and controlled substances). Most do NOT accept sharps, medical waste, or hazardous household waste.

Requirements may vary. Check with the individual locations for details.

Sample Result for Orange County

  • Goshen Police Department
    1 Grand Street
    Goshen, NY 10924
  • New York State Police Troop F - Middletown
    55 Crystal Run Road
    Middletown, NY 10941
  • Town of Newburgh Police Department
    300 Gardnertown Road
    Newburgh, NY 12550

Syringes and Needles Require Rigidity

Medications that require delivery through a needle and syringe (insulin, vitamin B12 injection), or lancets used to test blood sugar, must be disposed of in a puncture-proof plastic container with a tight-fitting screw top. Used syringes and needles are considered medical waste and should be dropped off at a sharp collection site.

Disposal of needles & syringes in a sharps container can be dropped off at many local hospitals. Check with your local hospitals for details.

Hazardous Drugs

Hazardous drugs are those which have the potential to cause harm including the abilities to cause gene mutations, defects in fetal development, and fertility impairment. These drugs also involve compounds that are highly reactive in the environment resulting in damage, toxicity, or corrosion. Often these drugs are not safe for pregnancy and should be kept away from children, pets, and pregnant women. Specific disposal is geared more towards medical facilities, however hazardous drugs are also in the outpatient setting and efforts to separate and seal these medications should be made before drop-box disposal.

COMMON OUTPATIENT HAZARDOUS DRUGS

  • Warfarin (Coumadin)
  • Epinephrine (EpiPen, aerosol inhaler)
  • Phentermine
  • Nicotine (patches, Nicoderm, Nicorette)
  • Oral chemotherapy agents
  • Oral antivirals
  • Metals:
  • Barium (barium sulfate)
  • Chromium (mineral preparations)
  • Selenium (dandruff shampoo)
  • Silver (silver sulfadiazine cream, silver nitrate)

Pilot Pharmaceutical Take-Back Program


ELECTRONIC PRESCRIBING

Frequently Asked Questions for Electronic Prescribing

​Revised: November 2016

As of March 27, 2016 it became mandatory for practitioners to issue electronic prescriptions for controlled and non-controlled substances. There still exists exceptions today. Prescriptions excepted from any electronic prescribing requirement include prescriptions issued by veterinarians, issued in circumstances where electronic prescribing is not available due to temporary technological or electrical failure, issued by practitioners to whom the commissioner has granted a waiver, issued by a practitioner under circumstances where such practitioner reasonably determines that it would be impractical for the patient to obtain substances prescribed by electronic prescription in a timely manner, and such delay would adversely impact the patient's medical condition, or issued by a practitioner to be dispensed by a pharmacy located outside the state.

​To be eligible for a waiver, a practitioner must demonstrate an economic hardship, technological limitations or some other exceptional circumstance. A practitioner who certifies they will not issue more than 25 prescriptions of any type during a twelve month period may also apply for a waiver. All waivers may be valid for up to a year and are renewable.

​Any amount of controlled substances being prescribed requires the prescription to be transmitted electronically. An exception to this is that a paper or oral prescription may be issued for a controlled substance, that does not exceed a 5 day supply, ONLY if the practitioner reasonably determines that it would be impractical for the patient to obtain substances prescribed by electronic prescription in a timely manner, AND such delay would adversely impact the patient’s medical condition.


FRAUD WASTE ABUSE

Medicare Learning Network® (MLN) Learning Management and Product Ordering System

ONLINE TRAINING: Medicare Parts C and D Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Training and Medicare Parts C and D General Compliance Training

Medicare Parts C and D Fraud, Waste, and Abuse Training and Medicare Parts C and D General Compliance Training

FWA Training Logs (Printable)


HIPAA

U.S. Department of Health & Human Services

Samples from the FAQs

Can a patient have a friend or family member pick up a prescription for her?

​Answer:

Yes. A pharmacist may use professional judgment and experience with common practice to make reasonable inferences of the patient’s best interest in allowing a person, other that the patient, to pick up a prescription. See 45 CFR 164.510(b). For example, the fact that a relative or friend arrives at a pharmacy and asks to pick up a specific prescription for an individual effectively verifies that he or she is involved in the individual’s care, and the HIPAA Privacy Rule allows the pharmacist to give the filled prescription to the relative or friend. The individual does not need to provide the pharmacist with the names of such persons in advance.

May physician's offices or pharmacists leave messages for patients at their homes, either on an answering machine or with a family member, to remind them of appointments or to inform them that a prescription is ready? May providers continue to mail appointment or prescription refill reminders to patients' homes?


Answer:

Yes. The HIPAA Privacy Rule permits health care providers to communicate with patients regarding their health care. This includes communicating with patients at their homes, whether through the mail or by phone or in some other manner. In addition, the Rule does not prohibit covered entities from leaving messages for patients on their answering machines. However, to reasonably safeguard the individual’s privacy, covered entities should take care to limit the amount of information disclosed on the answering machine. For example, a covered entity might want to consider leaving only its name and number and other information necessary to confirm an appointment, or ask the individual to call back.

A covered entity also may leave a message with a family member or other person who answers the phone when the patient is not home. The Privacy Rule permits covered entities to disclose limited information to family members, friends, or other persons regarding an individual’s care, even when the individual is not present. However, covered entities should use professional judgment to assure that such disclosures are in the best interest of the individual and limit the information disclosed. See 45 CFR 164.510(b)(3).

In situations where a patient has requested that the covered entity communicate with him in a confidential manner, such as by alternative means or at an alternative location, the covered entity must accommodate that request, if reasonable. For example, the Department considers a request to receive mailings from the covered entity in a closed envelope rather than by postcard to be a reasonable request that should be accommodated. Similarly, a request to receive mail from the covered entity at a post office box rather than at home, or to receive calls at the office rather than at home are also considered to be reasonable requests, absent extenuating circumstances. See 45 CFR 164.522(b).

Do I have to give my health care provider written permission to share or discuss my health information with my family members, friends, or others involved in my care or payment for my care?


Answer:

HIPAA does not require that you give your health care provider written permission. However, your provider may prefer or require that you give written permission. You may want to ask about your provider’s requirements.

Does HIPAA require that a health care provider document a patient’s decision to allow the provider to share his or her health information with a family member, friend, or other person involved in the patient’s care or payment for care?


Answer:

No. HIPAA does not require that a health care provider document the patient’s agreement or lack of objection. However, a health care provider is free to obtain or document the patient’s agreement, or lack of objection, in writing, if he or she prefers. For example, a provider may choose to document a patient’s agreement to share information with a family member with a note in the patient’s medical file.


Pharmacies must control the method by which labeled prescription containers are discarded because they contain PHI and, therefore, must be treated with the utmost care. Some pharmacies have been involved in lawsuits for the improper disposal of prescription containers. It is important that pharmacy staff remove labels and shred them or that they store containers in a disposal bin that obscures the information until they can be picked up by a third-party disposal vendor (who is also subject to HIPAA guidelines).

​Pharmacists are protected under the Act from incidental disclosures, such as being overheard during a store consultation, or healthcare instructions that are seen by another patient. But, just as with “minimum necessary” best practice is to have a policy in place for what is and is not acceptable and what is the baseline for information security. Announcing a patient’s name to pick up prescription is fine, so long as there is no health-specific information attached to the announcement.


IMMUNIZATION

Frequently Asked Questions

Epidemiology and Prevention of Vaccine-Preventable Diseases - The Pink Book

Pharmacists as Immunizers

Vaccine Storage & Handling Toolkit


MEDICAL MARIJUANA

New York State Medical Marijuana Program

Medical Marijuana Program Laws and Regulations

The New York State Medical Marijuana Program: Patient Information

Qualifying Conditions

Only patients with one of the following severe, debilitating or life-threatening conditions may qualify for the Medical Marijuana Program: cancer, positive status for HIV or AIDS, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, damage to the nervous tissue of the spinal cord with objective neurological indication of intractable spasticity, epilepsy, inflammatory bowel disease, neuropathy, chronic pain as defined by 10 NYCRR §1004.2(a)(8)(xi), or Huntington's disease. Patients must also have one of the following associated or complicating conditions: cachexia or wasting syndrome, severe or chronic pain, severe nausea, seizures, or severe or persistent muscle spasms.


MEDICATION ERROR PREVENTION

USP Pictograms

USP Pictograms are standardized graphic images that help convey medication instructions, precautions, and/or warnings to patients and consumers. Pictograms are particularly helpful in passing on important information to patients with a lower level reading ability and patients for whom English is a second language.

ISMP Self Assessments

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) provides healthcare organizations with ISMP Medication Safety Self Assessments. These tools help assess the medication safety practices in your organization surrounding the use of medication therapy, identify opportunities for improvement, and comparing your experience with the aggregate experience of demographically similar organizations.

CONTINUING EDUCATION REQUIREMENT

Education Law requires that registered pharmacists complete continuing education. A minimum of 45 contact hours (at least 23 live) is required in each three-year registration period. The 45 hours required must include at least 3 credits (home study or live) of formal continuing education on strategies and techniques to reduce medication and prescription errors.

INSTITUTE FOR SAFE MEDICATION PRACTICES

The Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), based in suburban Philadelphia, is the nation’s only 501c (3) nonprofit organization devoted entirely to medication error prevention and safe medication use. ISMP represents over 35 years of experience in helping healthcare practitioners keep patients safe, and continues to lead efforts to improve the medication use process. The organization is known and respected worldwide as the premier resource for impartial, timely, and accurate medication safety information.

ConsumerMedSafety.org

ConsumerMedSafety.org is provided by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). This unique website is designed to help the consumer avoid mistakes when taking medicines.


PHARMACY TECHNICIANS

Pharmacy Technicians in New York

The Pharmacy Technician primarily reports to the Pharmacy Manger and the Pharmacists on duty. In the retail setting, the purpose of this position is to assist the Pharmacist with serving customers and maintaining the pharmacy department. The technician is required to perform all tasks in a safe matter and following all state and federal laws and requirements. Duties and responsibilities of Pharmacy Technicians usually include and are not limited to: assisting customers, ringing register, accepting prescriptions, answering and making phone calls, data entry and preparing prescriptions as allowed by law, completing paperwork. Pharmacy technicians can not receive prescriptions from prescribers or their legal designees. They also can not counsel patients.

Pharmacy Technician Certification Board


PRESCRIPTIONS

Prescriptions

Education Law
Article 137, Pharmacy

§6810. Prescriptions.

1. … and no such drug shall be dispensed without affixing to the immediate container in which the drug is sold or dispensed a label

§6802. Definitions.

11. "Immediate container" does not include package liners

Critical and Important Label Elements

Regulations of the Commissioner

Part 63, Pharmacy

Section 63.12 Standardized patient-centered data elements to be used on all drug labels

In accordance with section 6830 of the Education Law, all prescription medicine dispensed to patients in this State must include

standardized patient-centered data elements as prescribed by in this section

a. Definitions. As used in this section:

1. Critical elements shall consist of:

i. patient name;

ii. directions for use by the patient, which directions shall be structured in full sentences

iii.drug name and strength.

2. Important elements shall consist of:

i. name, address and telephone number of the pharmacy;

ii. patient’s address;

iii. name of prescriber;

iv. the date of filling or refilling of the prescription; and

v. the prescription number or other identifying number assigned to the prescription.

b. All prescription drug labels shall contain all of the critical elements and all of the important elements.

1. Critical elements of each prescription label shall be:

i. emphasized by being highlighted in color, in bold type, or both: and

ii. printed in a minimum of a 12-point font.

2. Important elements of each prescription label and any other information contained on the label shall not be highlighted in

color or in bold type, shall be legible and shall not be presented in a fashion that undermines the emphasis on the critical

elements.

Multiple Prescriptions on One Blank

Education Law

Article 137, Pharmacy

​§6810. Prescriptions.

7.a. No prescription for a drug written in this state by a person authorized to issue such prescription shall be on a prescription

form which authorizes the dispensing or compounding of any other drug. No drug shall be dispensed by a pharmacist when such prescription form includes any other drug.

Transfer of Prescriptions

1. What is the responsibility of the pharmacist who is transferring information for a prescription refill? Answer: To record the

following:

● the name of the patient;

● that an authorized refill of the prescription has been transferred;

● name, address and telephone number of the pharmacy to which it was transferred;

● name of the pharmacist receiving the prescription information;

● name of the pharmacist transferring the information; and

● the date of the transfer.

2. What is the responsibility of the pharmacist who receives a refill transfer?
Answer: To produce a hard copy of the prescription information, ensure that the term "refill transfer" appears on the face of the hard copy, and record the following:

● the name of the patient;

● that an authorized refill of the prescription has been transferred;

● the name, address and telephone number of the pharmacy from which it was transferred;

● the name of the pharmacist receiving the prescription information;

● the name of the pharmacist transferring the information;

● the date of the original prescription and most recent transfer; and

● the original prescription number.

Copying a Prescription

Education Law

Article 137, Pharmacy

Section 6810. Prescriptions.

3. A copy of a prescription for a controlled substance shall not be furnished to the patient but may be furnished to any licensed

practitioner authorized to write such prescription. Copies of other prescriptions shall be furnished to the patient at his request,

but such copies are issued for the informational purposes of the prescribers only, and shall be so worded.

Foreign Prescriptions

A prescription written in a foreign country is permissible under certain circumstances. Pharmacists are cautioned to remember

that some drugs marketed in other countries may not be available in the United States in identical strengths and formulations.

Substitution of another product would not be appropriate. In no case may a prescription for a controlled substance be filled

unless the prescriber has a valid DEA number. Also, if the drug prescribed would require an "Official New York State Prescription" it must be on such prescription if it is to be filled by a New York pharmacy.

Serial Numbers

The serial numbers on official New York State Prescriptions do not contain the letter O. They may contain a zero.

Imprinted Prescriber Name

Education Law

Article 137, Pharmacy

§6810. Prescriptions.

8. Every prescription (whether or not for a controlled substance) written in this state by a person authorized to issue such

prescription and containing the prescriber's signature shall, in addition to such signature, be imprinted or stamped legibly and

conspicuously with the printed name of the prescriber who has signed the prescription. The imprinted or stamped name of the

signing prescriber shall appear in an appropriate location on the prescription form and shall not be entered in or upon any space

or line reserved for the prescriber's signature. The imprinted or stamped name shall not be employed as a substitute for, or fulfill

any legal requirement otherwise mandating that the prescription be signed by the prescriber.


RESTRICTED DRUGS

Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS)

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved flibanserin, under the brand name Addyi, for the treatment of sexual dysfunction in premenopausal women. As a safety precaution the approval of the drug includes a risk evaluation and mitigation strategy, or REMS. Health care providers who prescribe the medication and pharmacies that dispense it are required to first complete a training program to become certified.

Effective October 12, 2015 pharmacies must use the Clozapine REMS program. All individual clozapine registries will be discontinued.

Starting December 14, 2015(**The Deadline has been extended**), pharmacies must obtain a predispense authorization (PDA) before clozapine can be dispensed.

Isotretinoin must not be used by female patients who are or may become pregnant. There is an extremely high risk that severe birth defects will result if pregnancy occurs while taking isotretinoin in any amount, even for a short period of time. Potentially any fetus exposed during pregnancy can be affected. There are no accurate means of determining whether an exposed fetus has been affected. Because of this toxicity, isotretinoin can only be marketed under a special restricted distribution program. This program is called iPLEDGE™. Under this program, prescribers must be registered and activated with the iPLEDGE program and can prescribe isotretinoin only to registered patients who meet all the requirements of iPLEDGE. Isotretinoin can be dispensed only by a pharmacy registered and activated with iPLEDGE. Registered and activated pharmacies can only receive isotretinoin from wholesalers registered with iPLEDGE. Pharmacy registration is available through www.ipledgeprogram.com.

FEMALE PATIENTS WHO CAN GET PREGNANT
Must fill and pick up prescription within seven days counting the date of the pregnancy test as DAY 1.

MALE PATIENTS AND FEMALE PATIENTS WHO CANNOT GET PREGNANT
Must fill and pick up prescription within thirty days counting the date of the office visit as DAY 1.

Plan B One-Step was first approved in July 2009 for use without a prescription for women age 17 and older and as a prescription-only option for women younger than age 17. In April 2013, the product was approved for nonprescription use for women as young as 15.

The product is now available without a prescription for use by all women of reproductive potential and is available as an over-the-counter (OTC) product without age or point-of-sale restrictions.

you can sell only a limited amount (3.6 grams) of these drug products to each customer per day

• your customer can only buy a limited amount, (9 grams) of these drug products in a 30-day period


The Combat Methamphetamine Epidemic Act of 2005 sets daily and 30-day limits on the OTC sale of ephedrine and pseudoephedrine

• you can sell only a limited amount (3.6 grams) of these drug products to each customer per day

• your customer can only buy a limited amount, (9 grams) of these drug products in a 30-day period

The pharmacy must maintain written or electronic records for a period of two years containing:


Product name
Quantity sold
Name and address of purchaser
Date and time of the sale
Proof of identification
Signature of the purchaser

Qsymia is indicated as an adjunct to a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity for chronic weight management in adults with an initial body mass index (BMI) of:
• 30 kg/m2 or greater (obese) or
• 27 kg/m2 or greater (overweight) in the presence of at least one weight-related comorbidity such as hypertension, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or dyslipidemia

Limitations of Use:

The effect of Qsymia on cardiovascular morbidity and mortality has not been established


The safety and effectiveness of Qsymia in combination with other products intended for weight loss, including prescription and over-the-counter drugs, and herbal preparations, have not been established

Under the Drug Addiction Treatment Act (DATA), prescription use of Suboxone in the treatment of opioid dependence is limited to physicians who meet certain qualifying requirements, and who have notified the Secretary of Health and Human Services (HHS) of their intent to prescribe this product for the treatment of opioid dependence and have been assigned a unique identification number that must be included on every prescription. Prescriber verification is available here: https://www.samhsa.gov/bupe/lookup-form .

To check on a physician's waivered status, please call the Buprenorphine Information Center at 1.866.287.2728

As amended in December 2006, an individual physician may have a maximum of 30 patients on opioid therapy at any one time for the first year. One year after the date on which a physician submitted the initial notification, the physician may submit a second notification of the need and intent to treat up to 100 patients.

To decrease the chance of your getting a different type of dangerous abnormal heartbeat, TIKOSYN treatment must be started or re-started while you are in the hospital. The doctor who prescribed TIKOSYN and the hospital must have gone through special TIKOSYN training. Pharmacies may enroll in the TIKOSYN program through their website at www.tikosyn.com.

This Web site allows pharmacies that have completed the TIKOSYN Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) Program to verify the status of TIKOSYN prescribers.
http://www.tikosynlist.com

Tikosyn REMS modified: (on July 8, 2015) to remove the following from the Tikosyn REMS document and REMS appended materials;
the requirement for certified pharmacies to utilize a Tikosyn stamp, all references to the Tikosyn stamp, the phrase “...and dispensed for use only with documentation of safe use conditions”, and the REMS document was revised to clarify that the one-time recertification of prescribers and dispensers was required only after initial approval of the REMS.

The Transmucosal Immediate Release Fentanyl (TIRF) Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program is an FDA-required program designed to ensure informed risk-benefit decisions before initiating treatment, and while patients are treated to ensure appropriate use of TIRF medicines. The purpose of the TIRF REMS Access program is to mitigate the risk of misuse, abuse, addiction, overdose and serious complications due to medication errors with the use of TIRF medicines. You must enroll in the TIRF REMS Access program to prescribe, dispense, or distribute TIRF medicines.

The Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA 2000) enables doctors who meet qualifying criteria to receive a waiver to prescribe these medications for opioid dependence.


SYRINGES

Since 2001, the Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP) has allowed registered pharmacies to sell non-prescription hypodermic needles and syringes to persons 18 years of age or older in New York State. ESAP promotes access to sterile needles and syringes to reduce the transmission of HIV and other blood-borne infections. 

Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP)

- Licensed pharmacies, health care facilities, and health care practitioners who can otherwise prescribe hypodermic needles or syringes may register with the New York State Department of Health to sell or furnish up to 10 hypodermic needles or syringes to persons 18 years of age or older.
 

  • Persons who are age 18 years or older may legally obtain and possess hypodermic needles and syringes through ESAP- without a medical prescription.
  • Pharmacies may not advertise availability of hypodermic needles or syringes without a prescription and they must keep them in a manner that makes them available only to pharmacy staff (i.e., not openly available to customers).
  • Registered providers must cooperate in a program to assure safe disposal of used hypodermic needles or syringes.
  • Hypodermic needles and syringes provided through ESAP are accompanied by a safety insert explaining proper use, risk of blood borne diseases, proper disposal, dangers of injection drug use, how to access drug treatment as well as information about HIV/AIDS.

Expanded Syringe Access Program (ESAP): Overview of the Law and Regulations

APPLICATION FOR REGISTRATION IN EXPANDED SYRINGE ACCESS PROGRAM (ESAP)

ESAP Materials

Syringe Disposal

The POINT - Syringe Access; Drug and Syringe Disposal Locater


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